Skip to content

Kandinsky retrospective is natural for Guggenheim

November 23, 2009

An exhibition of oil paintings by the abstract artist celebrates the museum’s 50th anniversary.

Vasily Kandinsky

Vasily Kandinsky’s “Impression III [Konzert],” 1911. His work has three categories: “Impressions,” “Improvisations,” “Compositions.” (Guggenheim Museum)

By CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT Art Critic

Reporting from New York – “Kandinsky,” the big exhibition of 95 oil paintings made between 1902 and 1942 by the visionary pioneer of abstraction, Vasily Kandinsky, is a show that looks like it was made expressly for the spiral ramp of the Guggenheim Museum. That’s because in a sense it was.

Solomon R. Guggenheim, the museum’s founder, was a major collector of Kandinsky’s art, amassing no fewer than 150 canvases in his lifetime. (He died in 1949, five years after the artist.) The work was perhaps the most profound influence on the collector’s thinking about nonobjective painting, which shed direct relationships to the visible world. Kandinsky instead explored the emotive possibilities of color and form, study central to avant-garde art for the next half a century.

In 1939, a scant decade after the collector bought his first Kandinsky, he opened the Museum of Nonobjective Painting — the precursor to today’s Guggenheim. And 20 years after that, Frank Lloyd Wright’s radically designed Guggenheim Museum on Fifth Avenue opened, showing just how much nonobjective art had informed a variety of advanced ideas. A powerfully expressive, light-filled void pierces the building’s core.

Wright’s building recently underwent a much-needed, beautifully achieved restoration. As a celebration of its 50th anniversary, the Kandinsky retrospective (running until Jan. 13) not surprisingly elicits a major “Wow.”

Read more at: Kandinsky retrospective is natural for Guggenheim

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: